Fri 9/8

Doors 6:30 / Show 7:30
Electric Factory
— $35 ADV - $40 DOS | All Ages
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Biography

Glenn Danzig is a name that permeates, infects, and ultimately makes strong, the very soul of hard rock in the '90s. Through the legendary punk charge of his pre-Danzig outfits Misfits and Samhain, Danzig formed the backbone of today's mosh movement. Into the deep waves of the Danzig catalogue, and you've got a band that has created high-tension hybrids that are still being pondered and quietly adopted throughout today's metal community. Over eight million records sold, and Danzig is about to unleash a multi-media onslaught that will once again find disciples studying the master. But first a little history.Danzig's early works took full advantage of what was initially a vital and productive working relationship ith Rick Rubin, resulting in a self-titled 1988 debut and a follow-up in '90 called Lucifuge that together enveloped the man's interest in punk, doom, gothic new wave and an intense California twist on black Satanic metal, culminating in a display of shockingly dark hard rock that sent chills the likes of which today's Norwegian churchburners could never know. Danzig III: How The Gods Kill dropped in'92, rewriting the books on Sabbatherian doom metal; super charging the genre with molten guitar god riffs, foreboding but poetic lyrics,and above the fray, THAT VOICE. Glenn is a sonorious tenor blessed with the ability to caress and terrorize all within a few short breaths.As the luck of the draw would have it, Danzig next found himself with an odd, unplanned Hit on his hands; a live version of the debut album's 'Mother' introducing the mainstream to this buffed-up, 'black leather powerhouse'. 1993's Thralldemonsweatlive EP went on to platinum status (following a similarly exalted fate for the debut),and Danzig's commercial legacy was ensured. Never one to be complacent,Glenn rewired the band's sound into a frosty but intimate affair paradoxically rife with studio wizardry.Danzig 4P hit in '94,Glenn once more confounding the world with a record that would be a critically acclaimed masterpiece, casual but crafted, sinewy and insidious. As relations with Danzig's label Def American broke down, so did Danzig's relationship with his band.Glenn found himself seeking fresh personnel and a fresh perspective, creating the darkwave industrial rhythms of Danzig 5: Blackacidevil, a record which, once again, was to re-engineer the cutting edge of hard rock in Danzig's imposing,muscle-strapped image. But harsh circumstances have brewed, distilled, and unleashed a blistering counter punch by the name of Danzig 6:66 Satans Child, a record that is a visceral and aggressive statement of black intent, unafraid to clutch and grab from today's technologies, but more in tune with the frightening power of a well-juiced guitar. Danzig 6 features essentially the same line-up as its predecessor, but there are a number of fresh pioneers associated with the project.

Videos

  • Corrosion of Conformity

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    One of the first punk-metal fusion bands, Corrosion of Conformity were formed in North Carolina by guitarist Woody Weatherman during the early '80s. In their early years, C.O.C. became known for their aggressive sound, intelligent political lyrics, and willingness to break away from both hardcore and metal conventions. In the '90s, their shift to a more stripped-down, deliberate sound -- sort of Black Sabbath filtered through the Deep South -- brought them enough in line with the alt metal Zeitgeist to bring them a measure of mainstream popularity. C.O.C. debuted in 1983 with the thrashy, Black Flag-influenced Eye for an Eye, featuring a lineup of Weatherman, drummer Reed Mullin, vocalist Eric Eycke, and bassist Mike Dean. They began to build up a cult following with 1985's Animosity, but their label at the time, Death, grew tired of their internal instability -- lineup changes found Eycke replaced by vocalist Simon Bob -- and dropped them following 1987's Technocracy. It took several years for a new lineup to come together -- featuring Weatherman, guitarist Pepper Keenan, Mullin, vocalist Karl Agell, and bassist Phil Swisher -- but when it did, the result was 1991's Blind, a powerful, focused, more metallic record that increased their audience by leaps and bounds.

  • Mutoid Man

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    Mutoid Mans initial aspirations were fairly humble. Guitarist Stephen Brodsky (Cave In) and drummer Ben Koller (Converge, All Pigs Must Die) wanted to bask in their love of frantic, ferocious, no-frills metal. No riff was deemed too extreme, no drum pattern was considered too absurd. With the recruitment of bassist Nick Cageao, Mutoid Man pushed metals villainous pageantry to vaudevillian levels. Over the course of extensive touring on their debut album Bleeder, the bands live shows became exercises in showmanship, with the requisite headbanger gymnastics morphing into Van Halen-esque panache and hardcore-basement-show prankery. On their sophomore album, War Moans, the bands stage one-upmanship carries over to their songcraft, yielding an album of ridiculously savage hooks and next-level dexterity.

  • Moros

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    Doomed-sludge fiends MOROS released their exclusive, limited release split album (with Philly's Black Urn) in February of 2017 to critical acclaim. Featuring brand new and stunningly abrasive songs, MOROS received praise from Decibel, Invisible Oranges, and No Clean Singing for their massive two song offering. MOROS are dominating the Philadelphia music scene and beyond with their filthy style of miserable sludge and teeth-chattering, low-end riff obsession. “We’re making sludge through a death metal lens" explains guitarist/vocalist Jason Dost. With new music in the works and a full-length album being conjured for early 2018, MOROS are poised to deliver unrelenting savagery.

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