Skillet

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Unleashed Tour 2017

OPENING ACT(s): Sick Puppies , Devour The Day

Fri 2/10

Doors 7:00 / Show 8:00
Electric Factory
— $29.50 ADV - $35 DOS | All Ages
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Biography

Skillet recently made headlines when their last album, Awake, became one of just three rock albums to be certified platinum in 2012, forming an improbable triumvirate with the Black Keys’ El Camino and Mumford & Sons’ Babel. The news that Skillet had sold more than a million albums in the U.S. came as a shock to all but the band’s wildly diverse horde of fans, male and female, young and old—known as Panheads—whose still-swelling ranks now officially number in the seven-digit range. This remarkable achievement was announced just as Skillet was putting the finishing touches on their eagerly awaited follow-up album, Rise (Atlantic/Word). Unwilling to stand pat or rest on their laurels, the band—lead vocalist/bassist John Cooper, guitarist/keyboardist Korey Cooper (John’s wife), drummer/duet partner Jen Ledger and lead guitarist Seth Morrison, making his first appearance on record with Skillet—continue to explore new terrain on Rise, expertly produced by Howard Benson, who previously helmed the mega-successful Awake. Eager for new challenges, Cooper threw himself into collaborative songwriting to a far greater degree than ever before, co-writing the uplifting title song and the lacerating first single “Sick of it” with Scott Stevens, founder/leader of the L.A.-based Exies, while teaming with Nashville songsmiths Tom Douglas and Zac Maloy on the timely and anthemic “American Noise,” which Cooper considers to be the strongest song Skillet has yet recorded. On “American Noise” and the joyous “Good to Be Alive,” the band explores new stylistic territory, bringing an element of heartland rock into their aggressive, theatrical approach. The band expanded their musical palette, integrating natural, acoustic instruments like accordion, mandolin, dulcimer, harp, tympani and bells to their trademark slashing electric guitars, strings, churning synths and pummeling drums. It isn’t just the songs themselves that make Rise so gripping, it’s also the song sequences—like the radical contrast between the almost unbearable tension of “Sick of It” suddenly giving way to the ecstatic release of “Good to Be Alive,” or the way the closing three-song progression of “My Religion,” “Hard to Find” and “What I Believe” builds to a thrilling musical, thematic and emotional crescendo.

Videos

  • Sick Puppies

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    You hear it again and again. When one door closes, another one opens. However, it’s true - especially in the case of Sick Puppies. In the Fall of 2014, Emma Anzai [bass, vocals] and Mark Goodwin [drums] parted ways with their guitarist and vocalist. Weathering and persevering through this potentially life-changing event, the gold-selling, chart-topping Los Angeles-based and Australian-bred hard rock outfit knew one thing. They were going to make more music as Sick Puppies. “There was no question” affirms Emma. “We had no doubt that we wanted to continue. Mark and I got together and basically said, ‘first and foremost, we love music. We love this band and our fans, and we have put so much into it, and we are not done and want to take it further.’ In order to do that, we needed to find the right member.” Instead, the “right member” found them. With stints in several bands under his belt, Texas-born singer and guitarist Bryan Scott reached out to Emma via Facebook within days of the announcement. He sent her a video of himself performing, and she swiftly replied. “Both Mark and I knew he was the guy right away - he was cool and he sounded great. It was a natural progression. We were totally on to something” said Emma “Something just overwhelmed me,” admits Bryan. “I had a feeling that I needed to reach out. They needed a singer and guitarist and that’s what I am. I had always loved their music and as soon as I saw the post, I went home and immediately sent Emma a message. We clicked right off the bat. Music is in their blood - it’s who they are. They live and breathe it every day. I’m the same way.”

  • Devour The Day

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    Devour The Day offer a rather intriguing and completely appropriate metaphor for their second full-length album, S.O.A.R. “It’s like the difference between a superhero’s first and second movie,” smiles Joey Chicago [Bass, Vocals, Songwriter]. “In the first movie, the hero is still getting used to his powers—fumbling around and slowly understanding his place. By the beginning of the second film, he becomes what he’s meant to be. On S.O.A.R., we have become Devour The Day. We have a very firm grasp on who we are and the music we want to make. Even though we’ve been playing together for so long, it feels like the very beginning of our career.” It’s true the world has only just begun to witness the power of Joey and his other half in Devour The Day, Blake Allison [Lead Vocals, Guitar, Songwriter, Producer]. However, they got a pretty good glimpse at the group’s potential in the form of 2014’s Time & Pressure. The record would sell 20,000 plus copies and land multiple hits in the Top 25 at Active Rock. Most notably, the instantly recognizable “Good Man” went Top 10 at the format and moved over 100,000 singles to date. Simultaneously, the band shared bills with everyone from Sevendust and Three Days Grace to In This Moment and HELLYEAH.

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